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The Fault In Our Stars meets Tumblr
inspired by (x) — Divergent version (x)

silohouettes:

simplefoetus:

silohouettes:

silohouettes:

I actually love dogs more than most people tbh

no homo tho

why no homo?

the french word for dog is masculine and you can never be too safe

gerardgayofficial:

oh yeah have i ever shown u my sister’s jumper

Labrinth talks Zayn at Radio 1 Teen Choice Award x

Tagged: #perfect

noaahczerny:

and now it all unfolds,
the skill of an artist

Tagged: #tmi

muslimrave:

one time a boy tried to pull my hijab off

i punched him in the face

closed fist, short swing, right in the jaw

there is a point where you stop trying to educate people and start making the consequences of their racist bullshit real fuckin clear.

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

folieadontleaveryan:

map-of-problematique:

shawnsmirk:

I WANT TO DYE MY HAIR BLUE

I WANT A NOSE RING

I WANT A TATTOO

I WANT TO DO THINGS

WITH MY OWN BODY

BUT I CANT

BECAUSE OF SCHOOL

AND ALSO BECAUSE MY MOM

MOSTLY BECAUSE MY MOM

faitherinhicks:

bryankonietzko:

These are the images I made for the end of our NYCC panel last week. I know these have already made the rounds on the internet, but I thought I should share them here for posterity and for the folks who might not have seen them. Much to my surprise, even my improvised farewell/thank you speech was transcribed and shared along with the images, which was really nice. Here are those words as well, edited by me to correct what my mumbling likely made unclear for the transcriber and/or to represent what I meant to say:

"This is a really big deal for us. It’s been twelve years since we came up with this whole Avatar universe together. Avatar means so many different things to so many different people. To me, when I think of the creation of it, I just think of me and Mike sitting at my computer in this little house I rented in Burbank. And we would just share the keyboard and take turns. And just over the span of two weeks we cracked open this universe together. And twelve and half years later it’s just blossomed into something so huge. And it’s such a big part of our lives and people’s all over the world. These characters are real to us. Not in a delusional way, but in an emotional way. They really mean a lot to me and I know to Mike as well. And we just want to say thanks."

The panel and the signing were an amazing experience and a fitting sendoff for the show, even though I agree with Janet, PJ, and Dave: this show will live on, beyond the release of its final episode, for a long time. And a huge thanks to you guys for all the awesome letters and gifts. The ATLA/LOK fandom is an amazing international community of thoughtful, warmhearted humans.

Love, Bryan

*_*